Monday, April 20, 2015

Tuesday April 21st at 7:00 PM



Field Guide A Tempo by Henry Walters

Prompted by Thoreau’s thought-experiment, Field Guide A Tempo is a topographical map of sounds, a landscape that changes pace, from ballad to dirge to lullaby, tracing the contours of those rhythms that give form and voice to Time itself.  As the poet Rosanna Warren wrote, “Henry Walters’ poems are exuberantly ‘out of bounds’ and ‘in accord,’ inventing new edges for their passions in a wild sophistication of verse forms and private mythologies. Unafraid of ecstasy, this poet has stolen Hermes’ tortoise-lyre and on it he plays tunes at once ancient and violently new. Every line ignites.” Henry Walters was born in Chicago in 1984 and grew up in Indiana and southern Michigan. He studied Latin and Greek at Harvard College, beekeeping in Sicily, and falconry in Ireland. He has worked as a teacher, a naturalist, a practicing falconer, and a steward of a wildlife sanctuary. His poems, translations, and essays have appeared in a range of publications, from The Old Farmer’s Almanac to The American Guide to Hawk Migration Studies, and he is the recipient of Better Magazine’s 2013 prize for poetry. He currently lives in the beech and hemlock woods of Dublin, NH, where he coordinates the New Hampshire Young Birders Club and acts as Secretary for Experimental Living at Dublin School. Free and open to all.

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Wednesday April 15th at 7:00 pm


Raised on Songs and Stories with Irish Balladeer Paul Carroll

Paul Carroll grew up in Dublin during the ballad boom of the sixties where the pubs were packed with folk singers and ballad groups. It is there that he found a love for the music and songs that were to be part of his life. Paul emigrated to Australia in the early 70’s but he never strayed very far from the music, singing in the folk clubs of Sydney, Perth and Melbourne. During his time in Melbourne he was a founding member of the Celtic band, Poteen, who were Australia’s premiere Celtic band, sharing the stage with icons like Eric Bogle, The Dubliners, The Furey’s and Boys of the Lough. Paul has made his home in Derry, NH for nearly 25 years. Free and open to all.

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Thursday April 2nd at 7:00 PM



Thursdays April 2, 9, 23, 30 & May 7
Extreme Weather: A Five-Part Film & Discussion Series

Join us for this five-part film and discussion series on extreme weather, facilitated by UNH Marine  Docent and former Conval High School Oceanography teacher, Jon Manley. Free & open to all!

April 2: Climate Change. What is running our Climate? Presentation on the physics behind how the wind patterns, the ocean currents, the color of the earth and temperature changes cause weather and change the climate.
April 9: Hurricanes & Tornados. Film – CYCLONE – A National Geographic film that gives the basics of these weather systems.  Introduction to F-Scales.  Predictions of how rising oceans and climate change will influence future storms.
April 23: Katrina. FilmKATRINA – This NOVA film follows the buildup and results of one of the most costly and deadly storms to hit the United States gulf coast.  This production underscores the gap between what scientists can predict and the reluctance of people to listen.  Many who died refused to heed a mandatory evacuation.
April 30: Acid Seas. Film – TBA - This session will be a discussion of how the forces that are warming the oceans are also causing them to become more acidic. The implications on the oceans by this twofold threat will be highlighted.
May 7: The Isles of Shoals. A place of history, prosperity, pirates, treasure and even murder, the isles are subjected to some of the most severe weather in New Hampshire.  This session will be about the people books and stories of this rocky outpost. As seas rise, the isles may be among the first to disappear.  Along with the stories will be an opportunity to sign up for a trip to the isles this summer.  

Library Events for April 2015



From the Library…

April is National Poetry Month!
We will have special displays and projects for the entire month of April in honor of National Poetry Month. Write a poem on our magnetic poetry board at the front desk. Or simply read our Poem of the Day, posted in the library and chosen by our staff and volunteers. Step into the Children’s Room to check out our “Poet-Tree” display which will give you some wonderful poetry book suggestions. Kids, drop in anytime during April to make a descriptive animal poem. Teens and adults, come in and give “black-out” poetry a try. This method of poetry, which involves blacking out old book pages, combines art and poetry and produces very cool results! And finally, local poet Henry Walters will be reading his poetry on April 21st at 7:00 pm. Join us for all of these activities and more during the month of April! Free at your public library.

Thursdays April 2, 9, 23, 30 & May 7
Extreme Weather: A Five-Part Film & Discussion Series

Join us for this five-part film and discussion series on extreme weather, facilitated by UNH Marine  Docent and former Conval High School Oceanography teacher, Jon Manley. Free & open to all!

April 2: Climate Change. What is running our Climate? Presentation on the physics behind how the wind patterns, the ocean currents, the color of the earth and temperature changes cause weather and change the climate.
April 9: Hurricanes & Tornados. Film – CYCLONE – A National Geographic film that gives the basics of these weather systems.  Introduction to F-Scales.  Predictions of how rising oceans and climate change will influence future storms.
April 23: Katrina. FilmKATRINA – This NOVA film follows the buildup and results of one of the most costly and deadly storms to hit the United States gulf coast.  This production underscores the gap between what scientists can predict and the reluctance of people to listen.  Many who died refused to heed a mandatory evacuation.
April 30: Acid Seas. Film – TBA - This session will be a discussion of how the forces that are warming the oceans are also causing them to become more acidic. The implications on the oceans by this twofold threat will be highlighted.
May 7: The Isles of Shoals. A place of history, prosperity, pirates, treasure and even murder, the isles are subjected to some of the most severe weather in New Hampshire.  This session will be about the people books and stories of this rocky outpost. As seas rise, the isles may be among the first to disappear.  Along with the stories will be an opportunity to sign up for a trip to the isles this summer.  

Monday April 13th from 5:00-7:00 pm
State Representative Jon Manley

Rep. Manley (Hillsborough County District 3: Bennington, Greenfield and Hancock) will talk about the latest cuts proposed by the state legislature in Concord and what they mean for you. Please feel free to bring your questions and concerns.

Wednesday April 15th at 7:00 pm
Raised on Songs and Stories with Irish Balladeer Paul Carroll

Paul Carroll grew up in Dublin during the ballad boom of the sixties where the pubs were packed with folk singers and ballad groups.  It is there that he found a love for the music and songs that were to be part of his life. Paul emigrated to Australia in the early 70’s but he never strayed very far from the music, singing in the folk clubs of Sydney, Perth and Melbourne. During his time in Melbourne he was a founding member of the Celtic band, Poteen, who were Australia’s premiere Celtic band, sharing the stage with icons like Eric Bogle, The Dubliners, The Furey’s and Boys of the Lough. Paul has made his home in Derry, NH for nearly 25 years.  Free and open to all.

Thursday April 16th from 4:00 – 7:00 pm
Preserving Our Past Selectively with Dan Pickering

Old photos, slides, vinyl records, cassettes, and home videos are a treasure chest of stories and memories.  But in recent history we have undergone a blizzard of different devices and formats for sharing those stories.  And with today’s fast-paced world of Facebook, smartphones, & tablets, older analog media is at risk of being lost.  Advice, tutoring, and assistance can be found with a new volunteer program provided by the Hancock Town Library, Preserving Our Past-selectively, or POPs.  This service will help you start converting your most precious items to a digital format of your choice so that you can begin to create a digital legacy that can be shared with friends and loved ones, now, and in the future. Here’s what you do:

1)      Make an appointment at the library (525-4411) for a 30 minute analysis of what you want to convert to a digital format and what’s the best way to get it done.  Appointment times are available on Thursday April 16th between 4 and 7 pm. 

2)      Bring your photos, slides, tapes, records in a box or a bag to the appointment, but be selective.  If your collection is too large to fit in a manageable box or bag, bring samples of what you would like to convert.

3)      Think about how you would like to use your final product.  Online, like Facebook or email?  On a smartphone or tablet?  On your TV with a DVD player?

Dan Pickering, a Hancock resident, is providing this service as a volunteer.  He taught computer education, broadcasting, and video projects in the Michigan public schools for 31 years and continues his hobby/part-time occupation of video production at home in Hancock.  The only cost to you will be the cost of actual materials---such as DVDs or flash drives.

Tuesday April 21st at 7:00 pm
Field Guide A Tempo by Henry Walters

Prompted by Thoreau’s thought-experiment, Field Guide A Tempo is a topographical map of sounds, a landscape that changes pace, from ballad to dirge to lullaby, tracing the contours of those rhythms that give form and voice to Time itself.  As the poet Rosanna Warren wrote, “Henry Walters’ poems are exuberantly ‘out of bounds’ and ‘in accord,’ inventing new edges for their passions in a wild sophistication of verse forms and private mythologies. Unafraid of ecstasy, this poet has stolen Hermes’ tortoise-lyre and on it he plays tunes at once ancient and violently new. Every line ignites.” Henry Walters was born in Chicago in 1984 and grew up in Indiana and southern Michigan. He studied Latin and Greek at Harvard College, beekeeping in Sicily, and falconry in Ireland. He has worked as a teacher, a naturalist, a practicing falconer, and a steward of a wildlife sanctuary. His poems, translations, and essays have appeared in a range of publications, from The Old Farmer’s Almanac to The American Guide to Hawk Migration Studies, and he is the recipient of Better Magazine’s 2013 prize for poetry. He currently lives in the beech and hemlock woods of Dublin, NH, where he coordinates the New Hampshire Young Birders Club and acts as Secretary for Experimental Living at Dublin School. Free and open to all.

From the Children’s Room
Callie Faucher, Children’s Librarian

Every Monday from 3:15 to 4:15pm
Paws to Read with Coffee
Drop in and read to Coffee, a certified reading therapy dog. If you bring in 3 non-perishable items to donate to the local food pantry, you may pick out a stuffed animal graciously donated by Douglas Cuddle Toys.

Every Thursday at 10:30am
Story Time
Join local preschoolers with their parents and caregivers at Story Time! We sing, dance, play, listen to stories and do crafts. Upcoming themes include sunshine, springtime, snakes, rain, kites, and mud!

Tuesday, April 7th & Tuesday, May 5th from 3:15-4:15pm
Lego Club
Come build with us! Drop by the Children’s Room on the first Tuesday of each month to work on your Lego projects or build something new!

Saturday, April 11th & Saturday, May 16th from 11-12pm.
Paws to Read with Toven
Come by on April 11th and May 16th starting at 11am and read to Toven, a certified reading therapy dog. Bring your own books, or chose one from our collection. Toven will be in the Daniel’s Room.

Wednesday, April 22nd from 2:30 to 4pm
Play with Clay Class with Shana Brautigam
It’s mud season, so let’s play with clay! Join potter Shana Brautigam of Rooted in Clay Pottery to hand-build clay animal shakers and rattles. The class is limited to 15 kids, so please register at the library as soon as you can. Free! For kids aged 5 and up. Stop by or give us a call at 525-4411.

Questions? Call Mrs. Callie Faucher in the  Children’s Room, 525-4411.

HTL Trustee Minutes March 25, 2015



Present: Laurie Bryan, Mary Garland Amy Markus, Suzanne Shevenell, Meeting called to order at 1:00 pm.
The minutes of February 25, 2105 were reviewed; Bryan, seconded by Garland, made a motion to accept as written.  Motion to accept was unanimous, and minutes were accepted. The Treasurer’s report for the month ending February 28, 2015 was not ready at this time.  The Trustees will review the months of February and March at the April meeting.
Director’s Report:
WATER IS BACK ON IN THE BUILDING!!!!
Children’s Librarian: Markus continues to be pleased with Mrs. Faucher’s first weeks as Children’s Librarian. Teenage patrons found the ‘Blind Date with A Book’ fun. Thursday mornings with toddlers and Moms are enjoying the music and dance activities. In April, during school vacation week, a clay workshop will be held. Markus will be arranging an interface time between Faucher and the schoolteachers in their classrooms.
 April Programs: Markus presented the following program schedule summary, again noting that additional information can be found in the Hancock happenings as well as on the Library Website.
April 2, 9, 23 and 30 and May 7:‘An Exploration of Weather and Climate’, by John Manley, former science teacher from CONVAL.
April 13: Legislature update by Hancock Representative John Manley on current legislature issues from 5 to 7 pm.  Drop in anytime during these hours.
April 15: ‘Raised on Songs and Stories’ by Irish Musician Paul Carroll.
April 16: Dan Pickering will be available to advise people on converting materials in analog format to digital format from 4 to 7 pm.
April 21: Henry Walters reads his original poetry at 7 pm.
Apollo ILS System: System continues to work smoothly, patrons are happy with access of the library catalog from home, and reserve items activity is increasing in volume.

Both Shevenell and Markus attended the annual Friends of the Hancock Town Library meeting on March 14th. The Trustees acknowledged the continued and invaluable support that this organization provides to the Library. 
The Trustees also noted their appreciation of the many volunteers their efforts for the Library, noting that a formal thank you event will be planned for later this year.

There being no further business a motion to adjourn was made by Shevenell, seconded by Garland. The Trustees all voted in the affirmative and the meeting was adjourned at 1:40pm.









Thursday, March 26, 2015

TUESDAY MARCH 31st at 7:00 PM



The American Cider Renaissance with Ben Watson

Americans in huge numbers are discovering the pleasures of alcoholic or “hard” cider, yet few people know much about its rich history and cultural traditions. Join author, editor, and self-proclaimed “cider evangelist” Ben Watson for a fascinating look at the past, present, and future of this most typically New England tipple. What are the roots of cider? Why did it become so important in colonial times, only to fall into obscurity? And why is it enjoying such a resurgence today? Ben Watson is the author of Cider, Hard and Sweet (Countryman Press, 2013) and several other nonfiction books. He currently serves as Senior Editor at Chelsea Green Publishing Co. in Vermont and resides in Francestown. For many years he has been involved with conservation and biodiversity initiatives, through Slow Food and other organizations, and he is a volunteer organizer of the annual Cider Days festival in western Massachusetts. The US Cider Makers Association recently presented him with one of its first Cider Industry Awards, in recognition of his efforts to promote cider, apples, and cider producers around the world. Free and open to all.