Friday, January 9, 2015

A lot has changed at your local library


“Libraries are going away because everything is online now.” I hear some variation of this statement every once and again and I try my utmost to keep the ensuing scream of frustration contained to my “inside voice.” Where to start? - See more at: http://www.cabinet.com/cabinet/cabinetnews/1054806-308/a-lot-has-changed-at-your-local.html#sthash.2VaEY0XQ.5xtFyc4I.dpuf
“Libraries are going away because everything is online now.” I hear some variation of this statement every once and again and I try my utmost to keep the ensuing scream of frustration contained to my “inside voice.” Where to start? - See more at: http://www.cabinet.com/cabinet/cabinetnews/1054806-308/a-lot-has-changed-at-your-local.html#sthash.2VaEY0XQ.5xtFyc4I.dpuf
“Libraries are going away because everything is online now.” I hear some variation of this statement every once and again and I try my utmost to keep the ensuing scream of frustration contained to my “inside voice.” Where to start? - See more at: http://www.cabinet.com/cabinet/cabinetnews/1054806-308/a-lot-has-changed-at-your-local.html#sthash.2VaEY0XQ.5xtFyc4I.dpuf
Here's a link to an excellent article about how public libraries have changed over the years and how much we offer now. Written by Michelle Sampson from the Milford, NH public library. You can read the full article here.
“Libraries are going away because everything is online now.” I hear some variation of this statement every once and again and I try my utmost to keep the ensuing scream of frustration contained to my “inside voice.” Where to start? - See more at: http://www.cabinet.com/cabinet/cabinetnews/1054806-308/a-lot-has-changed-at-your-local.html#sthash.2VaEY0XQ.5xtFyc4I.dpuf
“Libraries are going away because everything is online now.” I hear some variation of this statement every once and again and I try my utmost to keep the ensuing scream of frustration contained to my “inside voice.” Where to start? - See more at: http://www.cabinet.com/cabinet/cabinetnews/1054806-308/a-lot-has-changed-at-your-local.html#sthash.2VaEY0XQ.5xtFyc4I.dpuf

Thursday, January 8, 2015

Thursday January 8th at 7:00 PM

NH author Ken Sheldon will be reading from his novel "Probability of Detection." Books for sale, autographs free! Admission free! Show us your hardy, New England faces and join us despite the cold. Heat in the Daniels Room will be cranked up!

Monday, December 22, 2014

Holiday Closing

The Library will be closed on Wednesday December 24th and Thursday December 25th. We will be open  Saturday December 27th.

We will also close Thursday January 1st but will be OPEN Wednesday December 31st, regular hours, 2-6 pm. Come in and grab a good book and a movie!

Hancock Library Trustee Minutes 12.17.14




Present: Laurie Bryan, Mary Garland Amy Markus, Suzanne Shevenell, Eric Spitzbarth – Selectman
Meeting called to order at 1:00 pm.
The minutes of November 19, 2104 were reviewed; Bryan, seconded by Garland, made a motion to accept as written.  Motion to accept was unanimous, and minutes were accepted. The Treasurer’s report for the month ending October 31st was reviewed. Specific cost center for Building and Grounds was discussed in detail, with Director Markus explaining that carpet cleaning of the Library and Daniels Room spaces, as well as the new outside sign was reflected in these numbers. The Trustees and Markus agreed that a detailed review of the paid bills relative to general ledger cost centers would be done before finalizing the 2014 Income and Expense Reports. The report for the period ending November 30th was not available due to the early meeting date of this month. The Trustees will review the last 2 months financials at their January, 2015 meeting. Bryan, seconded by Garland to approve the October report, made a motion. Report was accepted unanimously.

Director’s Report: Markus reported that the Apollo ILS System is working very well.  Patrons are using the Reserve a Book/Item from their homes, new patron cards are issued, and the staff is becoming familiar with the program.
Children’s Librarian Position Update:  Ads have been placed in local papers as well as on line with appropriate NH state sources.  Markus is very pleased with Teresa Earle’s work and her enthusiasm in providing coverage during this period.
Year End Reports: Both Markus and Bryan will prepare the yearend reports required by the Town.  The Trustees will review, sign, copy and file the yearend report from US Trust upon receipt of it.
Markus noted that the Library would be closed on the following holidays:  Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and New Years Day.

The Trustees will attend, at the request of the Select Board a meeting to review the 2015 budget on Friday December 19, 2014 at the Town Hall offices at 1:30pm.

Other Business: Contingency Planning: Bryan stated the need of adding phone numbers of all Trustees, and Staff to the Hancock Town Library Policy Handbook. Keys will be distributed to all Trustees.  The Trustees will also receive training in operating the Apollo ILS System, as a backup to the Library Director and Staff.

The next Library Meeting will be at 1:oo pm on January 28, 2015.

Motion to adjourn was made by Bryan, seconded by Garland.  The Trustees all voted in the Affirmative and the meeting was adjourned at 2:10pm.








Thursday, December 4, 2014

Thursday December 4th at 7:00 pm



Five Bullets with Larry Duberstein

Author Larry Duberstein will read from his latest book, Five Bullets, which even Kirkus Reviews loved.  Every Jew who lived through the Holocaust had a story worth telling, but not every Jew has been inclined to tell that story. Such was the case with Karel Bondy, a rising young structural engineer in Prague when the Nazis invaded his nation and began preparing the fortress town of Terezin to “receive” his people. Married and the father of three when he was taken there (and from there to Auschwitz), he was alone when luck allowed him to fight back, first with the partisans and later the Russian army. And he was alone when after the war he came to America to begin a new life as Carl Barry. What these experiences did to a strong yet sensitive man caught in the grip of the 20th century’s greatest tragedy is at the heart of this extraordinary novel. And because Bondy/Barry was not eager to share those experiences, we must rely on his inquisitive American nephew Lewis to ferret out the details for us–and upon author Larry Duberstein to weave their tales together, in all the horror and sadness and, more unexpectedly, the beauty and humor. Karel Bondy is an unforgettable character whose story will by turns shock, intrigue, and amuse you. “Duberstein creates a powerful story of humanity and inhumanity in this tale of war, survival and healing.”—Kirkus Reviews  A native of Brooklyn, Larry Duberstein now lives and works in Hancock, New Hampshire. Free and open to all.